These Soft and Fluffy Buttermilk Biscuits will literally melt in your mouth and they are super easy to make. They don’t have flaky layers, they’re simply soft, fluffy, and delicious!

Big fluffy buttermilk biscuits.

I can’t think of anything better than a batch of hot buttermilk biscuits right out of the oven. Can you? These biscuits are so easy and melt in your mouth good… you’ll be making them often!

Are you a fan of biscuits with flaky layers or big soft and fluffy biscuits with no layers? Or both? I personally love all biscuits, but the reason I especially love these big fluffy buttermilk biscuits is because they’re so versatile. If I’m pouring gravy over my biscuit I really don’t want flaky layers…I want a big fluffy biscuit. On the other hand if I’m wanting to slather my biscuit with butter and jam, then I can go for fluffy or flaky layers. If I’m sandwiching a big piece of country ham between two halves…well…I want a big fluffy biscuit.

A big fluffy buttermilk biscuit with fried apples.

If you’re a fan of flaky layers you might check out my recipe for Tender & Flaky Buttermilk Biscuits. They are yummy too. Oh, and just in case your mouth is watering right now, check out my recipe for Country Fried Apples. They are SO good on these biscuits!

This recipe starts with both butter and buttermilk

Butter & buttermilk – This recipe starts with butter & buttermilk, and they aren’t used in the way you would expect. Most biscuit recipes will call for cold butter, but not this one. You will start by melting 1/2 cup (1 stick) of butter and adding it to one cup + 1 tablespoon of cold full-fat buttermilk. Then you will place the mixture in the freezer for 15 minutes or so while you preheat the oven. The mixture will look like clabbered or curdled milk and that’s what you want.

Preheat oven to 450 degrees. Grease a small iron skillet and set aside. You can also use a round cake pan.

How to make big fluffy buttermilk biscuits

Prepping the dough

  1. Add the dry ingredients to a large mixing bowl and mix well.  Make a well in the center of the flour. Pour the buttermilk/butter mixture into the center.
  2. Using a rubber spatula, gently mix the flour and buttermilk until combined and shaggy looking. The dough should be slightly wet, and it should pull away from the sides of the bowl when mixing.
  3. Transfer the dough to a lightly floured work surface. 
  4. Lightly knead the dough about 3 to 4 times.
  1. Using your hands, pat the dough out to a thickness of 3/4 to 1-inch. Using a a 2.5 inch biscuit cutter, cut out the biscuits, making sure to not twist the cutter. Cut straight down and straight up.
  2. You want thick biscuits. Don’t make them 1/2-inch in thickness. They won’t rise as much and you’ll be disappointed. Make sure they are at least 3/4 inch in thickness and up to 1-inch.
  3. Place the biscuits, sides touching, in the greased iron skillet or cake pan. If you use a 2 1/2-inch cutter and make them 3/4-inch thick, you should get 7 biscuits.

Pro tips for making these biscuits

  • Measure your flour correctly: Use the spoon and level method. Flour gets compacted in a container or in the bag. Use a fork to lightly aerate the flour, then use a spoon to scoop up the flour and transfer it to your measuring cup. Then use a knife edge to level it off.
  • Don’t over brown the bottoms of your biscuits: If you don’t want your biscuits to over brown on the bottom, then don’t use butter to grease your pan or skillet. Use solid Crisco shortening. If you don’t have solid shortening then use liquid canola or vegetable oil. Butter over browns the bottoms before the tops get done.
  • Place biscuits with sides touching: If you want tall biscuits and biscuits that are soft on all sides, then place them touching in the skillet. I recommend using an iron skillet or round cake pan for this recipe. If you use a cookie sheet there will be lots of extra room left on the cookie sheet and that last row of biscuits won’t be snuggled up against other biscuits to help them rise tall and be soft on the one side.
  • Don’t over work the dough: Lightly knead the dough by picking up one end and folding it over onto the other half. Use lightly floured hands. Do this 3 to 4 times making sure the dough is not too wet. I use just enough flour on my hands to keep the dough from being too wet to handle, but you don’t want dry either. After you knead it lightly, simply use a floured hand to pat the dough out to the thickness you want. I like fat biscuits, so I pat my dough out to 3/4 – 1-inch in thickness. See the pictures above.
  • Don’t use expired flour, baking powder or baking soda: When using self-rising flour, check the expiration date on the bag. SR flour contains baking powder and baking soda. Neither of them have a very long shelf life. If you don’t bake often, chances are your BP & BS are expired. Click here to see how to test BP & BS for freshness.
A skillet of big fluffy buttermilk biscuits.

Once the biscuits come out of the oven brush the tops with melted butter and serve.

A big fluffy buttermilk biscuit with butter.

What if I don’t have buttermilk?

If you don’t have buttermilk readily available you can make a buttermilk substitute by combining 2 tablespoon of white vinegar or lemon juice with 1 cup of milk. Allow it to set for 5 minutes or until it looks curdled.

Fluffy buttermilk biscuits.

More recipes you might like…

Cinnamon Biscuits

Soft & Fluffy Cream Cheese Biscuits

Buttermilk Butter Dip Biscuits

Soft & Tender Buttermilk Drop Biscuits

Sweet Blueberry Biscuits with Lemon Glaze

Old Fashioned Angel Biscuits

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Big Fluffy Buttermilk Biscuits

  • Author: Cindy @mycountrytable
  • Prep Time: 15 minutes
  • Cook Time: 22 to 25 minutes
  • Total Time: 26 minute
  • Yield: 7 biscuits 1x
  • Category: bread/breakfast
  • Method: bake
  • Cuisine: American

Description

These big fluffy buttermilk biscuits will simply melt in your mouth and they’re so versatile, whether you’re slathering them with jam or pouring gravy over them. They are delicious!


Ingredients

Units Scale
  • 1 cup plus 1 tablespoon full-fat buttermilk, cold
  • 1/2 cup (1 stick) unsalted butter
  • 2 cups self-rising flour, spoon & leveled
  • 1 teaspoons baking powder
  • 2 teaspoons sugar, (optional)
  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted

Instructions

  1. Melt the butter. Add the butter to the cold buttermilk and mix the two together. The buttermilk will look sort of clabbered but that’s okay. Place the buttermilk mixture in the freezer for 15 minutes.
  2. Meantime, preheat oven to 450 degrees. Grease an iron skillet and set aside.
  3. Add the dry ingredients to a large mixing bowl and mix well.  Make a well in the center of the flour. Pour the buttermilk/butter mixture into the center. Using a rubber spatula, gently mix the flour and buttermilk until combined and shaggy looking. The dough should be slightly wet, and it should pull away from the sides of the bowl when mixing.
  4. Transfer the dough to a lightly floured work surface.  Lightly knead the dough about 3 to 4 times
  5. Using your hands, pat the dough out to a thickness of about  3/4 to 1-inch. Using a a 2.5 inch biscuit cutter, cut out the biscuits, making sure to not twist the cutter. Cut straight down back up.
  6. Place the biscuits sides touching in the greased skillet. Bake until the biscuits are golden brown on top, about 22 to 25 minutes and remove from oven. 
  7. Brush melted butter on the tops.

Notes

  • If you don’t have self-rising flour you can substitute 2 cups of AP flour, plus 2 teaspoons baking powder, 1/2 teaspoon baking soda, and 3/4 teaspoon salt.

Keywords: buttermilk biscuits, biscuits, self rising biscuits, fluffy biscuits, breakfast, breakfast foods, bread,